5 Reasons Why Podcasts are Great Learning Tools for Genealogists

As I sit on my living room couch underneath my favorite blanket, I listen to genealogical experts share their insights. With podcasts, we have the ability to listen to these experts comfortably at home, in our cars on our way to various places, and even at work. Podcasts are extremely beneficial for genealogy researchers to improve their skills for five reasons.

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1. Podcasts allow you to learn information quickly. Last year, I taught a genealogy course at my local family history center. I had a good command of much of the content I planned to explore, but not all of it. Listening to podcasts on focused subjects allowed me to fill gaps in my understanding quickly, so I could pass the information on to other researchers. Further, because podcasts are available any time or day, I did not have to wait to go to a conference or meeting to hear the content.

2. Podcasts can be listened to when you cannot read materials.
Listening to content via a podcast can be more accessible than reading in many situations. I listen to genealogy podcasts while I do chores and when I go running. In situations where you cannot read a book, you can still absorb genealogy material through listening. Reading genealogy and family history books are a must, but listening to content can be an important way to learn as well. With that, there is something special about hearing how someone speaks about a topic. We have all heard speakers that get us excited about a topic in large part due to their own enthusiasm on a subject.

3. Podcasts cover diverse genealogy subjects.
Interested in lineage societies? Interested in how to write for a genealogy journal or newsletter? There’s a podcast for all of the above. From how-tos to information on particular research systems, podcasts allow people to explore whatever they would like to know. iTunes and other services allow you to customize what shows you subscribe to. Blogtalk Radio offers several genealogy-related shows, including “Research at the National Archives and Beyond” and “The Forget-Me-Not Hour.”

4. Podcasts offer a depth of subject matter.
Podcasts are long enough to cover material in good detail. They can offer the right balance of depth and introductory information. Genealogy podcasts commonly last forty minutes to one and half hours. This length usually affords speakers enough time to delve into a subject.

5. Podcasts direct you to other resources to explore. Effective podcast speakers explain what they know and where listeners can find more information. My favorite podcasts regularly direct me to more genealogy references online and in print.

What are your favorite genealogy podcasts?


fullsizerender-1Shelby Ward is from Kansas and lives in Knoxville, Tennessee. She has taught on the subject of African Diaspora genealogy, history, and culture at the Knoxville Family History Center and started the Beck Cultural Exchange Center Genealogical Society. She is the creator of Millie’s Porch, a family history start-up, and participates in several Facebook genealogy groups.

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